ICBC

Current Road Safety Campaigns 2017


ICBC asking drivers to take a break from your phone when you're behind the wheel

Every day, there are now approximately 875 crashes on B.C. roads, nearly two per minute, many of these due to distracted driving. In fact, distracted driving accounts for more fatalities on B.C. roads than impaired driving. Approximately 78 people are killed as a result of distracted driving and driver inattention every year.

Everyone has a part to play in keeping our roads safe.

Visit ICBC for more information


Crashes on the rise in B.C.; new ICBC campaign targets bad driving habits

August 3, 2017

According to a new survey completed by Insights West, most drivers say that driving in the province has gotten worse in the last five years – pointing at bad driving behaviours as one of the top contributors to B.C.'s road problems.

Respondents feel that drivers today are more distracted, more aggressive and more impatient, making driving in B.C. more dangerous.

Despite this, the survey also found that 99% of all respondents considered themselves to be good or excellent drivers. Yet the same respondents:

  • incorrectly answered road test questions (over 3/4 of respondents, 78%, got at least one incorrect),
  • admitted to being an aggressive driver (1/5 of respondents, 18%),
  • said they might not follow road rules to make up time while driving (over 1/3 of respondents, 37%)
  • felt that it was OK to 'bend the rules' every once in a while if no other drivers were around (1/3 of respondents, 32%), and
  • confessed to driving in an emotional state at least some of the time (99% of all respondents).

Take the DRIVE SMART quiz here

Visit ICBC for more information and links to the survey


Canada 150 is no excuse to drink and drive, says ICBC and police

June 29, 2017

As we celebrate Canada's 150th year anniversary this weekend and kick off the summer season, ICBC and police are urging drivers to plan ahead for a safe ride home if any of your activities this summer involve alcohol.

Each year in B.C., 66 people die in crashes involving impaired driving and nearly half* of those deaths happen during summer months. On Canada Day, 180 people are injured and one person is killed in 640 crashes every year in B.C.

If you plan to drink, leave your car at home. With many options available – like arranging a designated driver, calling a taxi or taking transit—there's no excuse to drink and drive.

If you're hosting a celebration this summer and plan to serve alcohol, a new ICBC special event permit kit is free to order on icbc.com. It'll also be featured if you apply for an event liquor permit on BCLiquorStores.com. The kits includes items to encourage guests to not drink if they're the designated driver or find a safe ride home.

Starting this long weekend, police are stepping up their enforcement of impaired drivers at CounterAttack roadchecks throughout B.C. ICBC road safety and community coordinators are also increasing public education at community events throughout the province.

ICBC supports two impaired driving education campaigns every year as well as funding for CounterAttack enhanced police enforcement. Learn more facts in ICBC's infographic.


Summer school’s in session for drivers and parents

ICBC’s top tips to help keep kids safe on summer break

With B.C. school children and teens starting their summer break from school this week, ICBC is asking drivers to be especially alert this season, particularly near playgrounds and around youth walking or riding their bikes.

Every year in B.C., five pedestrians aged five to 18 die and 250 are injured in crashes involving a vehicle. A young cyclist dies every year in B.C. and another 120 young cyclists are injured in crashes involving a vehicle.*

Tips for drivers:

  • Playground speed limits are year-round: With longer summer days, drivers should remember that the 30km/hr speed limit is from dawn to dusk, every day.
  • Summer school speed limits are in effect: For schools that hold summer classes, the school zone speed limit of 30 km/hr is in effect from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on school days. School zone signs will indicate if a school is holding summer sessions.
  • Wait at crosswalks: Parents and their young children may need more time when crossing the street. Don’t pass any car waiting at a crosswalk as they may be stopped for those crossing the street. Wait for pedestrians to get to the other side of the street before resuming your travel.
  • Slow down on residential streets: Expect the unexpected when children are at play, including the possibility of a teen running to catch an errant ball or a child running out from between parked cars. Slow down and be prepared to stop suddenly.
  • Be patient with younger cyclists: Leave plenty of room between your car and young cyclists, in particular. Shoulder check for cyclists before turning right and watch for oncoming cyclists before turning left.
  • Distracted walkers: Be aware of pedestrians around you, especially for teens who are wearing headphones or using their cell phones while walking, as they not be paying close attention to the road.

Tips for parents:

  • Review safety rules: Review road safety rules with your children and practice how to use crosswalks safely. Set limits to where they can walk alone and where they must be accompanied by an adult.
  • Accompany young children: Children under 10 should always be accompanied by an adult when crossing a street or walking close to the road.
  • Safe outdoor play areas: Establish safe play areas around your home for younger children, such as your backyard. Supervise your children or assign an older child to be in charge. Teach your child that the road is never a safe place to play, even if their toy rolls into the street or a driveway.
  • Demonstrate good walking habits: Practice good walking habits that keep you and your family safe. Teach your child to stand a few steps from the curb while waiting at a crosswalk. Show your child that jaywalking is never OK by always using a crosswalk.
  • Distracted walking: Remind your teen to be aware of their surroundings when walking. Using their cell phones while walking or using headphones can prevent any pedestrian from noticing oncoming cars and other hazards.
  • Cycling safety: Teach safe cycling behaviour to your children such as cycling in a straight line, performing hand signals and shoulder checking. Outfit their bike with a bell, lights and reflective materials. Children should wear bright, reflective clothing so they can be seen in the dark.
  • Head safety: Make wearing a helmet a rule for your child if they want to use their bike, skateboard or rollerblades.

Please visit ICBC for additional Road Safety information


Attachments
Description Date File Size
DPP and DRP brochure 2009-08-19 216KB
Unsafe Speed 2009-05-26 219KB